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One take-a-way I took from the ACC Show in SF is the importance of negative space.

Necklace by Julia Dziuba. Beach themed textural collage that incorporate negative space in their composition

Necklace by Julia Dziuba. Beach themed, textural collage that incorporate negative space in its composition

Negative space is something I general use in paintings but is usually lacking in my jewelry. I’ve been thinking about why that is. This is not a new concept after all.

My general style is “intense.” I like chunk. I like movement.  I generally feel the piece isn’t complete until it is sufficiently dense and complex. Is this the natural progression of a beader? To increase complexity? I like pieces that build and build and take the eye on a little journey.

Look over here, no, over here, wait but isn’t THAT interesting?

But maybe that is the problem. It’s not a relaxing sonter through an interesting composition. There are too many jolts and it can be overwhelming.

Density may be correlated with skill but it is not correlated with sophisticated design. When I first started thinking about this I thought it was a matter of stripping out, slimming down and simplifying. And it is. But it isn’t just that. Here might be a good time to circle back to negative space.

Necklace by Julia Dziuba. Beach themed, textural collage created with shell and coral and incorporates negative space in its design.

Necklace by Julia Dziuba. Beach themed, textural collage created with shell, coral and sterling silver.

When used in jewelry negative space can allow a larger composition to surface from complex components with a natural, breezy feel. This allows the complex portions to pop without suffocating. I am now striving to find this balance.

Let me know what you think!

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